Was J. Edgar Hoover really Black???

Genealogy Records May Indicate that J. Edgar Hoover Was African-American

Was founding FBI director J. Edgar Hoover an African-American man?

Nearly 40 years after the death of founding FBI director J. Edgar Hoover, research may reveal that the crime fighting bureau chief was actually African-American according to “The Washington Post.”

“My grandfather told me that this powerful man, Edgar, was his second cousin, and was passing for white,” says Millie McGhee, an African-American relative of Hoover’s. “If we talked about this, [Edgar] was so powerful he could have us all killed. I grew up terrified about all this.”

McGhee began to uncover facts about the possibility of Hoover’s Black ethnicity after she dug through altered court records, conducted oral interviews with both white and Black Hoovers and enlisted licensed genealogists who determined that Hoover was indeed a relative of hers.

The mystery of Hoover’s genealogy has become a topic of interest recently due to the the Clint Eastwood film “J. Edgar” released earlier this month. In the film, Eastwood makes no mention of Hoover’s race, much to the chagrin of his Black relatives such as McGhee.

“Since the movie has come out, so many people have asked me why my information about Hoover’s black roots was not included,” said McGhee who has authored two books on the topic, “Secrets Uncovered: J.Edgar Hoover-The Relative” and “Secrets Uncovered : J. Edgar Hoover Passing For White?”

Do you think McGhee’s research on J. Edgar Hoover’s genealogy should have been included in Eastwood’s film?

Live & Direct Show 6/13

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Gov. Bruce Rauner wants to reinstate the death penalty

CHICAGO — Gov. Bruce Rauner announced Monday a call to reinstate the death penalty in Illinois for mass murderers and those convicted of killing a police officer.

It was a surprise proposal that was part of public statements in Chicago about his amendatory veto of gun-control legislation that calls for expanding Illinois’ 72-hour wait period for hand guns to military-style assault weapons.

Rauner said he wants to expand the 72-hour wait period for all firearm sales, not just assault weapons, a ban on so-called “bump stocks” and authorizing restraining orders for taking away guns from “dangerous individuals.”

As governor, Rauner can either veto legislation sent to his desk outright, or propose changes to it, called an amendatory veto.

Rauner’s changes to HB 1468, which concerns waiting periods, create a new category of homicide called “death penalty murder.” It would apply to offenders 18 and over that prosecutors charge with killing peace officers or two or more people without lawful justification.

Legislators can now turn his changes of the gun-control bill into law through a simple majority vote, or override the veto with a two-thirds majority vote, which would make the original language of the legislation the law of the land.