Was J. Edgar Hoover really Black???

Genealogy Records May Indicate that J. Edgar Hoover Was African-American

Was founding FBI director J. Edgar Hoover an African-American man?

Nearly 40 years after the death of founding FBI director J. Edgar Hoover, research may reveal that the crime fighting bureau chief was actually African-American according to “The Washington Post.”

“My grandfather told me that this powerful man, Edgar, was his second cousin, and was passing for white,” says Millie McGhee, an African-American relative of Hoover’s. “If we talked about this, [Edgar] was so powerful he could have us all killed. I grew up terrified about all this.”

McGhee began to uncover facts about the possibility of Hoover’s Black ethnicity after she dug through altered court records, conducted oral interviews with both white and Black Hoovers and enlisted licensed genealogists who determined that Hoover was indeed a relative of hers.

The mystery of Hoover’s genealogy has become a topic of interest recently due to the the Clint Eastwood film “J. Edgar” released earlier this month. In the film, Eastwood makes no mention of Hoover’s race, much to the chagrin of his Black relatives such as McGhee.

“Since the movie has come out, so many people have asked me why my information about Hoover’s black roots was not included,” said McGhee who has authored two books on the topic, “Secrets Uncovered: J.Edgar Hoover-The Relative” and “Secrets Uncovered : J. Edgar Hoover Passing For White?”

Do you think McGhee’s research on J. Edgar Hoover’s genealogy should have been included in Eastwood’s film?

Live & Direct Show 6/13

Click on link below for audio

https://www.spreaker.com/episode/15043751

Live & Direct Show 5/29

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www.spreaker.com/episode/14922417

NBA Issues Drake A Warning Over “Use Of Bad Language”

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Drake’s trash talking might come to a halt.

Drake doesn’t seem to have a similar career path as Master P and will likely never end up joining the NBA and flexing his basketball skills, but being the Global Ambassador for the Raptors does allow him to sit courtside and ultimately, talk his shit to players as if he was on the court. A few days a go, the rapper and Kendrick Perkins had a heated moment during the game which resulted in security intervening. While no fight broke out, it seemed to warrant enough of a concern that the NBA has reportedly given Drake a warning on his choice of language during games.

USA Today Sports reports that Drake’s been issued a warning by the NBA over “the use of bad language” during the games. This comes shortly after his confrontation with Kendrick Perkins during Game 1 of the Cavs vs. the Raptors. League spokesperson Tim Frank said that the Raptors have also discussed this with Drake already.

There hasn’t been any details on the warning nor does it seem like he’ll be facing any sort of punishment for it but there’s a good chance we won’t be getting any more viral moments from the rapper in the future. This season the NBA has also taken an effort to stop fan misconduct which also includes the use of verbal abuse.

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Kanye West Has Reportedly Doubled Donald Trump’s Support Among Black Men

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Trump is profiting off Kanye’s endorsement.

While Kanye West has caught no end of grief from seemingly every rapper in the game after exclaiming his support for Donald Trump, it seems as though his message is being heard, at least by some people who have traditionally not been fans of the president.

According to the Washington Times, a new Reuters poll has been released that shows Trump’s support among black men has doubled in the past week, thanks directly to Kanye’s support. To be clear, Trump’s approval among black men was never super high to begin with, and his approval only grew from 11% to 22% among black males. 7% claimed to have “mixed feelings” about Trump, up from 1.5% the week before, and 71% stated that they disapprove of Trump’s performance in the Oval Office.

Regardless, to grow by so much in a week is a testament to the influence that Kanye still wields despite his constant stream of controversial statements. That, or there were more black male Trump supporters than was originally thought, and thanks to Kanye they no longer feel afraid to admit it.

While Trump may have gained in-roads with black men thanks to Kanye, black women weren’t buying into his shtick, with Trump’s approval rating only increasing from 6% to 9%. Trump’s overall national approval rating currently hovers at around 41%.

Kanye has quickly become President Trump’s most popular celebrity endorsement, instantly becoming a favorite among conservative media figures like Alex Jones, Ben Shapiro, and Charlie Kirk, most of whom were publicly against rap music before Kanye declared himself a Trump fan.

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South Dakota man ID’d as person shot dead in officer-involved shooting at Merrillville car dealership

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MERRILLVILLE — A suspect accused of entering a car dealership armed with a knife Wednesday is dead following an officer-involved shooting at Art Hill Ford Lincoln dealership on U.S. 30, authorities have confirmed.

The 30-year-old man was identified Wednesday afternoon by the Lake County Coroner’s office as Jimmy Terry, of Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

Griffith Police Chief Greg Mance, a spokesman for the Northwest Indiana Major Crimes Task Force, said the task force is investigating the shooting that involved Merrillville police.

Merrillville police were called out at 11:38 a.m. to Art Hill Ford Lincoln, 901 W. Lincoln Highway, after receiving a 911 call that a man was armed with a knife and “chasing an employee” inside the dealership, Mance said.

As officers arrived, Mance said they received updated information from 911 dispatch that Terry had entered a dark colored Jeep, believed to be his own, in an attempt to leave the dealership. Mance said he has received some preliminary information that Terry allegedly demanded keys to a vehicle when he entered the dealership.

A traffic stop was conducted, during which Terry was shot by police, Mance said.

In an effort to preserve the integrity of the investigation, Mance declined to say what factors led to the police-involved shooting, saying there were several witnesses who are being interviewed.

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Mance confirmed Terry was armed with a knife when he was shot. He was taken to Methodist Hospitals Southlake Campus in Merrillville, where he was pronounced dead.

The coroner’s office said Wednesday afternoon Terry died from gunshot wounds in a homicide. He was pronounced dead at 12:12 p.m. at the hospital.

Officers with the task force, the Merrillville Police Department and Lake County Sheriff’s Department gathered at the scene just after noon Wednesday.

A dark-colored Laredo Jeep with a South Dakota license plate was parked in front of the dealership entrance. At least one shell casing and several other items were identified at the scene with yellow evidence markers.

Merrillville Police Chief Joe Petruch said two Merrillville officers are on paid administrative leave as the investigation continues, per department protocol.

Director Ryan Coogler Says ‘Black Panther’ Brought Him Closer To His Roots

Here's How 'Black Panther: The Album' Came Together

As a kid in Oakland, Calif., Ryan Coogler hung out at a comic book shop near his school, reading about superheroes who looked nothing like him.

“As I got older, I wanted to find a comic book character that looked like me and not just one that was on the sidelines,” Coogler says. “And I walk in and ask the guy at the desk that day, and say, ‘Hey man, you got any comic books here about black people, you know, like with a black superhero?’ And he was like, ‘Oh, yeah, as a matter of fact, we got this one.'”

That guy handed him a copy of Black Panther. And today, Coogler is the director of the Marvel movie adaptation about T’Challa — the king of fictional African nation Wakanda — who dons a super-science-powered suit to protect his people.

This superhero movie is actually a new challenge for Coogler, who’s only 31 years old. He got a ton of praise for his first film, Fruitvale Station, about an unarmed black man killed by a transit cop in Coogler’s hometown of Oakland. Then, he directed Creed, the latest Rocky movie — and now, Black Panther, which many hope will be a cultural turning point.

And Coogler says he’s feeling the pressure of those expectations. But, he adds, “for me, the pressure’s always been there, ’cause I’m in a career that’s unexpected, in terms of where I’m from and what I look like, you know, how old I am. So I’ll always feel pressure. I’ll always feel like I’m up against odds that are kind of insurmountable and, ‘Man, if I don’t get this right, I might not ever work in this town again.’ But you kind of got to tune that stuff out.”


Interview Highlights

On travelling to Africa to research the film

For me, it was about this question of “What does it mean to be African?” It was a question I couldn’t answer. When I was taking this project, it was a question I needed to answer about myself, you know, which is the personal connection that I’m talking about. And it’s a question that sounds specific, but it’s actually universal for a lot of reasons. … I mean if you ask yourself, “Now what does it mean to be Ukrainian?” or “What does it mean to be Eurasian?” it’s a deep question, right, if you think about it. It’s not a question you can answer with one word. But it’s a question you can spend your life trying to figure out, and have fun doing it, I truly believe.

On the importance of Black Panther having his own movie

For one, like, this medium of superhero films and this blockbuster medium, it’s just myth-making but on terms that are current. That’s why these movies make a lot money. That’s why people talk about them, you know what I mean, people dress up as them.

Chadwick Boseman as T’Challa in Black Panther.

Matt Kennedy/©Marvel Studios 2018

You look at any society in any period of time, they had their version of how they did their myth-making. Whether it was vaudeville, whether it was plays, whether it was on the plains of Africa … and it was griots, you know, beating the drum and telling stories. That was their version of myth-making. Right now, it’s these big, huge, large-canvas films that you go see in IMAX, that you go see in 3-D.

And there’s a massive audience — not just of people of color but everybody — who wants to see different perspectives in this myth-making. They want to see something fresh, they want to see something new, but also feels very real. You walk around in this world, and you see people who look like me — all the time. I’m from the Bay Area man, where we’ve got a very successful basketball team right now. The Golden State Warriors run out there, run up and down the court, [and] it’s a bunch of black dudes. But everybody in the stadium — even though it’s in Oakland — there’s very few black people in that stadium. But everybody’s wearing they jerseys and experiencing the emotions that they feel. You know, when Steph Curry hits a shot, it’s a little white kid or a little Asian kid in there that feel like they just made the shot.

On the state of representation in entertainment

I mean, there was a time in sports when black people weren’t allowed to play on professional teams, you know what I mean. You go down the line in every sport, there was a time when it was like a crazy idea to let a black person run out there and put a jersey on. You know, it was a time when professional teams would say, “We won’t make any money if we put a black person out there.” You know, it took that one to happen and then they looked around and was like, “Wait, we’re making more money — we gotta do this more. Oh yeah, people will cheer for a person who doesn’t look like them.” I mean, I know I watched superhero movies and did all the time.

The Talon Fighter flies over Wakanda in Black Panther.

©Marvel Studios 2018

On the creation of Wakanda

Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, who invented the character and invented Wakanda, they were two Jewish-American artists who were in the States — in New York — and pulling from the things that they were seeing around them to make these stories. I’ve met Stan Lee, and I know that he was tapping into the zeitgeist, purposefully, of what he saw African-Americans and people all over the world going through. He kind of came up with this pulpy concept, and … when you really think about it, man, it is something that’s based on circumstance. Like it’s fiction, that has base in reality. Africa’s a continent that’s known for its resources, you know. It’s very rich in terms of any kind of resource that you can get out of the ground that has value. You’re going to find it in abundance somewhere on that continent, whether it’s oil, whether it’s rubber, whether it’s gems or precious metals.

It led to colonization and exploitation. It led to borders being drawn, not by the people who are from there, you know. And it led to the mental horrors of colonization, which comes with being told that you’re less than, and not worthy of, and losing your language — losing your heritage, and the cousin of colonization, which is a very scary relative of it, is the theft of bodies, is what happened to my ancestors.

That said, Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, they were aware of all these things. And they tapped into something when they said “Man, what if that never happened to a place? What if a place had something really cool, had a cool mineral, you know, had a coltan, had a gold, had a diamond and they never were conquered and they found a way to manipulate it, and stay separate from the world and grow and become great?” And … found a way to maintain that, what kind of conflict would that bring about? You know, it was Afro-futurism. It was all these great things that amazing writers have built on, and built on, and built on, in the 60 years since they did that.

L to R: Chadwick Boseman as T’Challa/Black Panther and Nakia (Lupita Nyong’o) in Black Panther.

©Marvel Studios 2018

On filming Black Panther from the perspective of Wakandans

I think perspective is everything — perspective and proximity to whose story you’re watching, it’s one of the gifts that cinema has. Like for me, I never left the country until I made a film that got into a festival that was outside the country. How I used to travel was through watching movies, and I like the movies that put me right on the ground. I like City Of God, I like Un Propheteyou know, these films that put you like right in the zone. You’re experiencing it with the people who it’s about.

On whether he feels like he can go back to making smaller, indie films after Black Panther

Yeah, I mean I think intimacy can be achieved in a film on any budget. I feel, personally, like I have some of my most intimate scenes I’ve ever made in this movie. You know, I just want to make films that resonate with me, that are interesting to me, that deal with themes that I’m passionate about.

Like, I mean this movie brought me closer to my roots. This movie took me to the continent of Africa, which is somewhere I wanted to go since my mom and dad sat me down and told me I was black, you know what I mean? So I hope to make movies that’ll challenge me as an artist and as a person. That’s really what I hope to do.

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