South Dakota man ID’d as person shot dead in officer-involved shooting at Merrillville car dealership

Image result for south dakota man killed in merrillville in

MERRILLVILLE — A suspect accused of entering a car dealership armed with a knife Wednesday is dead following an officer-involved shooting at Art Hill Ford Lincoln dealership on U.S. 30, authorities have confirmed.

The 30-year-old man was identified Wednesday afternoon by the Lake County Coroner’s office as Jimmy Terry, of Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

Griffith Police Chief Greg Mance, a spokesman for the Northwest Indiana Major Crimes Task Force, said the task force is investigating the shooting that involved Merrillville police.

Merrillville police were called out at 11:38 a.m. to Art Hill Ford Lincoln, 901 W. Lincoln Highway, after receiving a 911 call that a man was armed with a knife and “chasing an employee” inside the dealership, Mance said.

As officers arrived, Mance said they received updated information from 911 dispatch that Terry had entered a dark colored Jeep, believed to be his own, in an attempt to leave the dealership. Mance said he has received some preliminary information that Terry allegedly demanded keys to a vehicle when he entered the dealership.

A traffic stop was conducted, during which Terry was shot by police, Mance said.

In an effort to preserve the integrity of the investigation, Mance declined to say what factors led to the police-involved shooting, saying there were several witnesses who are being interviewed.


Mance confirmed Terry was armed with a knife when he was shot. He was taken to Methodist Hospitals Southlake Campus in Merrillville, where he was pronounced dead.

The coroner’s office said Wednesday afternoon Terry died from gunshot wounds in a homicide. He was pronounced dead at 12:12 p.m. at the hospital.

Officers with the task force, the Merrillville Police Department and Lake County Sheriff’s Department gathered at the scene just after noon Wednesday.

A dark-colored Laredo Jeep with a South Dakota license plate was parked in front of the dealership entrance. At least one shell casing and several other items were identified at the scene with yellow evidence markers.

Merrillville Police Chief Joe Petruch said two Merrillville officers are on paid administrative leave as the investigation continues, per department protocol.

Director Ryan Coogler Says ‘Black Panther’ Brought Him Closer To His Roots

Here's How 'Black Panther: The Album' Came Together

As a kid in Oakland, Calif., Ryan Coogler hung out at a comic book shop near his school, reading about superheroes who looked nothing like him.

“As I got older, I wanted to find a comic book character that looked like me and not just one that was on the sidelines,” Coogler says. “And I walk in and ask the guy at the desk that day, and say, ‘Hey man, you got any comic books here about black people, you know, like with a black superhero?’ And he was like, ‘Oh, yeah, as a matter of fact, we got this one.'”

That guy handed him a copy of Black Panther. And today, Coogler is the director of the Marvel movie adaptation about T’Challa — the king of fictional African nation Wakanda — who dons a super-science-powered suit to protect his people.

This superhero movie is actually a new challenge for Coogler, who’s only 31 years old. He got a ton of praise for his first film, Fruitvale Station, about an unarmed black man killed by a transit cop in Coogler’s hometown of Oakland. Then, he directed Creed, the latest Rocky movie — and now, Black Panther, which many hope will be a cultural turning point.

And Coogler says he’s feeling the pressure of those expectations. But, he adds, “for me, the pressure’s always been there, ’cause I’m in a career that’s unexpected, in terms of where I’m from and what I look like, you know, how old I am. So I’ll always feel pressure. I’ll always feel like I’m up against odds that are kind of insurmountable and, ‘Man, if I don’t get this right, I might not ever work in this town again.’ But you kind of got to tune that stuff out.”

Interview Highlights

On travelling to Africa to research the film

For me, it was about this question of “What does it mean to be African?” It was a question I couldn’t answer. When I was taking this project, it was a question I needed to answer about myself, you know, which is the personal connection that I’m talking about. And it’s a question that sounds specific, but it’s actually universal for a lot of reasons. … I mean if you ask yourself, “Now what does it mean to be Ukrainian?” or “What does it mean to be Eurasian?” it’s a deep question, right, if you think about it. It’s not a question you can answer with one word. But it’s a question you can spend your life trying to figure out, and have fun doing it, I truly believe.

On the importance of Black Panther having his own movie

For one, like, this medium of superhero films and this blockbuster medium, it’s just myth-making but on terms that are current. That’s why these movies make a lot money. That’s why people talk about them, you know what I mean, people dress up as them.

Chadwick Boseman as T’Challa in Black Panther.

Matt Kennedy/©Marvel Studios 2018

You look at any society in any period of time, they had their version of how they did their myth-making. Whether it was vaudeville, whether it was plays, whether it was on the plains of Africa … and it was griots, you know, beating the drum and telling stories. That was their version of myth-making. Right now, it’s these big, huge, large-canvas films that you go see in IMAX, that you go see in 3-D.

And there’s a massive audience — not just of people of color but everybody — who wants to see different perspectives in this myth-making. They want to see something fresh, they want to see something new, but also feels very real. You walk around in this world, and you see people who look like me — all the time. I’m from the Bay Area man, where we’ve got a very successful basketball team right now. The Golden State Warriors run out there, run up and down the court, [and] it’s a bunch of black dudes. But everybody in the stadium — even though it’s in Oakland — there’s very few black people in that stadium. But everybody’s wearing they jerseys and experiencing the emotions that they feel. You know, when Steph Curry hits a shot, it’s a little white kid or a little Asian kid in there that feel like they just made the shot.

On the state of representation in entertainment

I mean, there was a time in sports when black people weren’t allowed to play on professional teams, you know what I mean. You go down the line in every sport, there was a time when it was like a crazy idea to let a black person run out there and put a jersey on. You know, it was a time when professional teams would say, “We won’t make any money if we put a black person out there.” You know, it took that one to happen and then they looked around and was like, “Wait, we’re making more money — we gotta do this more. Oh yeah, people will cheer for a person who doesn’t look like them.” I mean, I know I watched superhero movies and did all the time.

The Talon Fighter flies over Wakanda in Black Panther.

©Marvel Studios 2018

On the creation of Wakanda

Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, who invented the character and invented Wakanda, they were two Jewish-American artists who were in the States — in New York — and pulling from the things that they were seeing around them to make these stories. I’ve met Stan Lee, and I know that he was tapping into the zeitgeist, purposefully, of what he saw African-Americans and people all over the world going through. He kind of came up with this pulpy concept, and … when you really think about it, man, it is something that’s based on circumstance. Like it’s fiction, that has base in reality. Africa’s a continent that’s known for its resources, you know. It’s very rich in terms of any kind of resource that you can get out of the ground that has value. You’re going to find it in abundance somewhere on that continent, whether it’s oil, whether it’s rubber, whether it’s gems or precious metals.

It led to colonization and exploitation. It led to borders being drawn, not by the people who are from there, you know. And it led to the mental horrors of colonization, which comes with being told that you’re less than, and not worthy of, and losing your language — losing your heritage, and the cousin of colonization, which is a very scary relative of it, is the theft of bodies, is what happened to my ancestors.

That said, Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, they were aware of all these things. And they tapped into something when they said “Man, what if that never happened to a place? What if a place had something really cool, had a cool mineral, you know, had a coltan, had a gold, had a diamond and they never were conquered and they found a way to manipulate it, and stay separate from the world and grow and become great?” And … found a way to maintain that, what kind of conflict would that bring about? You know, it was Afro-futurism. It was all these great things that amazing writers have built on, and built on, and built on, in the 60 years since they did that.

L to R: Chadwick Boseman as T’Challa/Black Panther and Nakia (Lupita Nyong’o) in Black Panther.

©Marvel Studios 2018

On filming Black Panther from the perspective of Wakandans

I think perspective is everything — perspective and proximity to whose story you’re watching, it’s one of the gifts that cinema has. Like for me, I never left the country until I made a film that got into a festival that was outside the country. How I used to travel was through watching movies, and I like the movies that put me right on the ground. I like City Of God, I like Un Propheteyou know, these films that put you like right in the zone. You’re experiencing it with the people who it’s about.

On whether he feels like he can go back to making smaller, indie films after Black Panther

Yeah, I mean I think intimacy can be achieved in a film on any budget. I feel, personally, like I have some of my most intimate scenes I’ve ever made in this movie. You know, I just want to make films that resonate with me, that are interesting to me, that deal with themes that I’m passionate about.

Like, I mean this movie brought me closer to my roots. This movie took me to the continent of Africa, which is somewhere I wanted to go since my mom and dad sat me down and told me I was black, you know what I mean? So I hope to make movies that’ll challenge me as an artist and as a person. That’s really what I hope to do.

Colin Kaepernick named Man of the Year by GQ Magazine.

GQ Magazine named its “men of the year” this morning, with former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick receiving the honor of Citizen of the Year.

The magazine released the cover featuring the four “new American heroes,” including Kaepernick, late night host Stephen Colbert, NBA star Kevin Durant and actress Gal Gadot.

Colin Kaepernick signs $1mill book deal. 

Colin Kaepernick signs $1M book deal.

Colin Kaepernick, the NFL player at the forefront of protests that have swept the league and raised the ire of President Trump, has signed a book deal, Page Six reported.
The deal, reportedly worth just over $1 million, is with One World, an imprint of Random House. Further details on the book were not immediately available.

Kaepernick, who led the San Francisco 49ers to a Super Bowl appearance in 2013 and has been a free agent since March, filed a grievance earlier this month against NFL owners, accusing them of colluding to keep him out of the league in retaliation for his outspoken views on social issues.

Kaepernick was the first NFL player to take a knee during the national anthem before games during the 2016 season. Kaepernick said he was protesting police brutality and racial injustice, and pledged to donate $1 million to charitable causes.


Players across the league began taking part in demonstrations during the national anthem, with some taking a knee, some raising a fist and others linking arms.

The issue of players protesting was thrust back into the spotlight when Trump in September suggested owners should fire players for taking a knee. He has since repeatedly called the demonstrations disrespectful, and last Sunday lamented the league has shown “no leadership” in allowing players to continue protesting.

Master P Wants to Team Up with Colin Kaepernick to Form Their Own Football League. Says Colin K don’t need the NFL. 

This week news broke that Colin Kaepernick is suing the NFL. The one-time Superbowl quarterback accuses the league’s owners of colluding to keep him from being signed by a team.
The free agent has not played this season with some people speculating it’s because he started the kneeling protest during the national anthem. In an interview with TMZ, Hip Hop mogul Master P suggests Kap should take another approach to get back on a football field.

“They’re gonna have to start their own league,” said P. “Maybe Kaepernick, if he wants to stay in shape and play in our basketball league, or I’ll help him start his own league.”
The No Limits Records founder added, “Maybe that’s what I’ll do next, start the football [league].”

Are You Really “African American”???? Here is a video that’ll make you question the things around you.


Blaq Icons: Mae C. Jemison- Engineer, Physician & NASA Astronaut 

Mae Carol Jemison was born in Decatur, Alabama, on October 17, 1956, the youngest child of Charlie Jemison and Dorothy Green. Her father was a maintenance supervisor for a charity organization, and her mother worked most of her career as an elementary school teacher of English and math at the Beethoven School in Chicago.
The family moved to Chicago, Illinois, when Jemison was three years old, to take advantage of the better educational and employment opportunities there. Jemison says that as a young girl growing up in Chicago she always assumed she would get into space. “I thought, by now, we’d be going into space like you were going to work.”She said it was easier to apply to be a shuttle astronaut, “rather than waiting around in a cornfield, waiting for ET to pick me up or something.”
In her childhood, Jemison learned to make connections to science by studying nature. Once when a splinter infected her thumb as a little girl, Jemison’s mother turned it into a learning experience. She ended up doing a whole project about pus. Jemison’s parents were very supportive of her interest in science, while her teachers were not. “In kindergarten, my teacher asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up, and I told her a scientist,” Jemison says. “She said, ‘Don’t you mean a nurse?’ Now, there’s nothing wrong with being a nurse, but that’s not what I wanted to be.”In an interview with, she further explains how her sheer interest in science was not accepted. “Growing up…I was just like every other kid. I loved space, stars and dinosaurs. I always knew I wanted to explore. At the time of the Apollo airing, everybody was thrilled about space, but I remember being irritated that there were no women astronauts. People tried to explain that to me, and I did not buy it.” 

Jemison says she was inspired by Martin Luther King Jr.; to her King’s dream was not an elusive fantasy but a call to action. “Too often people paint him like Santa — smiley and inoffensive,” says Jemison. “But when I think of Martin Luther King, I think of attitude, audacity, and bravery.” Jemison thinks the civil rights movement was all about breaking down the barriers to human potential. “The best way to make dreams come true is to wake up.”
Jemison began dancing at the age of 11. “I love dancing! I took all kinds of dance — African dancing, ballet, jazz, modern — even Japanese dancing. I wanted to become a professional dancer,” said Jemison. At the age of 14, she auditioned for the leading role of “Maria” in West Side Story. She did not get the part but Jemison’s dancing skills did get her into the line up as a background dancer. “I had a problem with the singing but I danced and acted pretty well enough for them to choose me. I think that people sometimes limit themselves and so rob themselves of the opportunity to realise their dreams. For me, I love the sciences and I also love the arts,” says Jemison. “I saw the theatre as an outlet for this passion and so I decided to pursue this dream.”Later during her senior year in college, she was trying to decide whether to go to New York to medical school or become a professional dancer. Her mother told her, “You can always dance if you’re a doctor, but you can’t doctor if you’re a dancer.”
Jemison graduated from Chicago’s Morgan Park High School in 1973 and entered Stanford University at the age of 16. “I was naive and stubborn enough that it didn’t faze me,” Jemison said. “It’s not until recently that I realized that 16 was particularly young or that there were even any issues associated with my parents having enough confidence in me to [allow me to] go that far away from home.” Jemison graduated from Stanford in 1977, receiving a B.S. in chemical engineering and fulfilling the requirements for a B.A. in African and Afro-American Studies. She took initiative to get even further involved in the black community by serving as head of the Black Students Union during her college years. Jemison said that majoring in engineering as a black woman was difficult because race was always an issue in the United States. “Some professors would just pretend I wasn’t there. I would ask a question and a professor would act as if it was just so dumb, the dumbest question he had ever heard. Then, when a white guy would ask the same question, the professor would say, ‘That’s a very astute observation.'”In an interview with the Des Moines Register in 2008 Jemison said that it was difficult to go to Stanford at 16, but thinks her youthful arrogance may have helped her. “I did have to say, ‘I’m going to do this and I don’t give a crap (damn).'” She points out the unfairness of the necessity for women and minorities to have that attitude in some fields.

Jemison obtained her Doctor of Medicine degree in 1981 at Cornell Medical College. She interned at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center and later worked as a general practitioner. During medical school Jemison traveled to Cuba, Kenya and Thailand, to provide primary medical care to people living there. During her years at Cornell Medical College, Jemison took lessons in modern dance at the Alvin Ailey school. Jemison later built a dance studio in her home and has choreographed and produced several shows of modern jazz and African dance.

Gerald Anderson Lawson (Engineer) “Interchangeable Video Game Cartridges” 

Lawson was born in Queens, New York City on December 1, 1940. His father Blanton was a longshoreman with an interest in science, while his mother Mannings worked for the city, and also served on the PTA for the local school and made sure that he received a good education. Both encouraged his interests in scientific hobbies, including ham radio and chemistry. Lawson said that his first-grade teacher helped him encourage his path to be someone influential similar to George Washington Carver. While in high school, he earned money by repairing television sets. He attended both Queens College and City College of New York, but did not complete a degree at either.

In 1970, he joined Fairchild Semiconductor in San Francisco as an applications engineering consultant within their sales division. While there, he created the early arcade game Demolition Derby out of his garage. In the mid-1970s, Lawson was made Chief Hardware Engineer and director of engineering and marketing for Fairchild’s video game division. There, he led the development of the Fairchild Channel F console, released in 1976 and specifically designed to use swappable game cartridges. At the time, most game systems had the game programming stored on ROM storage soldered onto the game hardware, which could not be removed. Lawson and his team figured out how to move the ROM to a cartridge that could be inserted and removed from a console unit repeatedly, and without electrically shocking the user. This would allow users to buy into a library of games, and provided a new revenue stream for the console manufacturers through sales of these games. The Channel F was not a commercially successful product, but the cartridge approach was picked up by other console manufacturers, popularized with the Atari 2600 released in 1977.
While he was with Fairchild, Lawson and Ron Jones were the sole black members of the Homebrew Computer Club, a group of early computer hobbyists which would produce a number of industry legends, including Apple founders Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak. Lawson had noted he had interviewered Wozniak for a position at Fairchild, but did not hire him.
In 1980, Lawson left Fairchild and founded Videosoft, a video game development company which made software for the Atari 2600 in the early 1980s, as the 2600 had displaced the Channel F as the top system in the market. Videosoft closed about five years later, and he started to take on consulting work. At one point, he had been working with Stevie Wonder to produce a “Wonder Clock” that would wake a child with the sound of a parent’s voice, though it never made it to production. Lawson later worked with the Stanford mentor program and was preparing to write a book on his career.

In March 2011, Lawson was honored as an industry pioneer for his work on the game cartridge concept by the International Game Developers Association (IGDA).