Democrats Introduce Articles Of Impeachment Against Trump aka #45

House Democrats introduced articles of impeachment Wednesday against President Donald Trump, though they acknowledged their efforts have no chance of success while Republicans control both houses of Congress.

Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Tennessee, introduced five articles of impeachment that include obstruction of justice for Trump’s decision to fire former FBI Director James Comey, two emoluments clause violations, undermining the independence of the federal judiciary and undermining the freedom of the press.

“The time has come to make clear to the American people and to this President that his train of injuries to our Constitution must be brought to an end through impeachment,” he said.

Cohen, the ranking member on the House judiciary committee’s Constitution subcommittee, acknowledged the limitations of his proposal.

“I don’t expect the House judiciary committee, which is operated like a branch of the administration, to take up hearings,” he said.

He told members of the press he would likely be facilitating briefings in lieu of hearings.

“There are many reasons why I think the President is an awful President, an awful person, but not all those reasons rise to the level of impeaching a sitting President. We are not seeking his impeachment because of what he did before he was President,” Rep. Luis Gutiérrez, D-Illinois, one of the bill’s co-sponsors, said beside Cohen.

White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders responded in a statement, saying time spent calling for Trump’s impeachment “would be better spent focusing on tax relief for American families and businesses.”

“It’s disappointing that extremists in Congress still refuse to accept the President’s decisive victory in last year’s election,” she said.

Michael Ahrens, a spokesman for the Republican National Committee, called the impeachment effort “radical.”

“House Democrats lack a positive message and are completely unwilling to work across the aisle, so instead they’ve decided to support a baseless radical effort that the vast majority of Americans disagree with,” he said.

This isn’t the first time Democrats have argued to impeach Trump. Earlier this month, Rep. Pramila Jayapal, D-Washington, said the President has committed “significant constitutional impeachable violations,” adding that Democrats needed to act.

Mother of Fallen Soldier says “Trump Did Disrespect My Son, His Wife and Our Family


The family of fallen Army soldier La David Johnson confirmed that President Donald Trump did disrespect her son and his entire family during a condolence call, allegedly. Trump vehemently denied the claims via Twitter, saying that Congresswoman Frederica S. Wilson misheard what transpired on the call after witnessing the discussion during a limousine ride.

                           SUBMIT YOUR MUZIQ AND HEAR IT PLAYED ON THE WEBSITE AND DURING PODCASTS!


The Washington Post exclusively reports:

Sgt. La David T. Johnson’s mother, Cowanda Jones-Johnson, told The Washington Post that she was present during the call from the White House on Tuesday to Johnson’s widow, Myeshia Johnson. Johnson’s mother also stood by an account of the call from Rep. Frederica S. Wilson (D-Fla.) that Trump told Johnson’s widow that her husband “must have known what he signed up for.”
“President Trump did disrespect my son and my daughter and also me and my husband,” Jones-Johnson said.
Trump lashed back. He denied Wilson’s account in a Twitter message Wednesday. He said he had “proof” that the exchange did not go as Wilson had described. Trump did not elaborate, but White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said the president had not taped the conversation. She said several White House staffers were in the room during the call, including chief of staff John Kelly.


Twitter Fingers Trump defended himself in his usual ham-fisted fashion, using the finesse of a stampeding water buffalo. Although all of this is speculation, how shocking would it be if it were true? Also “that Congresswoman” has a name, Mr. President.

 

Nelly arrested early Saturday morning and charged with second-degree rape 

Nelly was arrested early Saturday morning and charged with second-degree rape following an incident that occurred on the rapper’s tour bus following a Friday night concert in Auburn, Washington.


Nelly, born Cornell Haynes Jr., was booked into Des Moines, Washington’s SCORE Jail just before 6:40 a.m. PST Saturday, three hours after the Auburn Police Department responded to a call from a woman who said that the rapper raped her on the tour bus.

Nelly is currently on the Smooth Stadium Tour with Florida Georgia Line and the Backstreet Boys; the trek came to Auburn’s White River Amphitheatre on Friday night.
According to Q13 Fox, following the concert, Nelly came to nearby Seattle and picked up a woman who he then brought back to his tour bus in Auburn, which was parked behind a local Wal-Mart.
At 3:48 a.m., the woman called police and said Nelly sexually assaulted her on the bus. Auburn Police, citing probable cause for arrest, took the rapper into custody and charged him with second-degree rape. After less than 90 minutes at SCORE, Nelly was released from custody at 8:02 a.m.
“A female called 911 to report that she was sexually assaulted by a male, who is known as the rapper ‘Nelly.’ The alleged assault was reported to occur on the tour bus that was parked at the listed location,” Auburn Police said in a statement. “Nelly had performed at the White River Amphitheater just hours before.” The department added, “Auburn Police are continuing to investigate this incident. The above details are all we have to release at this time.”
The rapper’s representatives did not respond to Rolling Stone’s request for comment, but a lawyer for Nelly told TMZ, “Nelly is the victim of a completely fabricated allegation. Our initial investigation, clearly establishes the allegation is devoid of credibility and is motivated by greed and vindictiveness. I am confident, once the scurrilous accusation is thoroughly investigated, there will be no charges. Nelly is prepared to pursue all all legal avenues to redress any damage caused by this clearly false allegation.”
The Smooth Stadium Tour comes to Ridgefield, Washington Saturday night.


BHRE Update:

Nelly has released a statement following his arrest Saturday morning on second-degree rape. “Let me say that I am beyond shocked that I have been targeted with this false allegation,” the rapper tweeted. “I am completely innocent. I am confident that once the facts are looked at, it will be very clear that I am the victim of a false allegation. I do want to apologize to my loved ones for the embarrassment and for putting myself in a situation where I could be victimized by this false and defaming allegation. I also want to thank my fans for their unwavering support. They know me. I assure you I will be vindicated. And I assure you, I will pursue every legal option to address this defaming claim.”

Marilou Danley has been identified as gunman’s companion. Witness say she was yelling “You’re All Going To Die Tonight” before being removed from concert. She is now detained in Las Vegas 


Las Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock’s girlfriend Marilou Danley has been detained and the house they shared raided by police following the attack that left 50 dead and 200 more injured.She is believed to be an Australian citizen of Indonesian heritage and was described by police as his room mate or companion. 

She lived on the Gold Coast in Queensland for more than a decade with her former husband, an Australian man, who has since passed away. She moved to the United States 20 years ago. 


According to Paddock’s brother Eric, who spoke exclusively to DailyMail.com, said that there was ‘absolutely no indication he could do something like this’.

Adding: ‘He was just a guy. Something happened, he snapped or something, he was just a guy.

‘He has no political affiliation, no religious affiliation, as far as we know. This wasn’t a terror attack’. 

Early on Monday morning police in Las Vegas issued a statement to say that Danley was no longer a person of interest in the investigation. 

Paddock was confirmed dead early in the investigation, leaving police in search of 62-year-old Marilou. 

She and the shooter are said to be roommates or companions, though the precise nature of their relationship has not been made clear.  

Huge Score for Bill Cosby pre-trial in sex-crime case: No parade of accusers. 

Bill Cosby should be celebrating Friday: There won’t be a parade of accusers at his trial.
When he goes before a jury on criminal sexual assault charges in suburban Philadelphia, set for June, prosecutors will be able to call only one accuser — out of a total of 13 sought by prosecutors — besides the complainant in the case, Judge Steven O’Neill ruled in an order Friday.


O’Neill said in his order that he carefully balanced the probative value of such testimony versus its prejudicial impact on Cosby and concluded that one accuser would be allowed to testify at the trial.
“It’s a huge win for Cosby,” declared Stuart Slotnick, a criminal defense attorney in Philadelphia who has been following the case.
“It’s a mixed decision,” says Dennis McAndrews, a former prosecutor who now practices in suburban Philadelphia. “The positive for the defense is that they only have to test the credibility of two people as opposed to a what I consider a critical mass of four or more.
“Once you get four or more, the optics and the psychology of attacking that many people becomes dramatically different — it’s much easier for a jury to disbelieve two rather than four or more,” McAndrews says.
Andrew Wyatt, spokesman for Cosby’s legal team, said there would be no comment until at least Monday, after a scheduled hearing on whether to change the venue for the trial due to pre-trial publicity.
Montgomery County District Attorney Kevin Steele issued a statement that attempted to cast the ruling in a positive light.
“This ruling is important as the jury will now be allowed to assess evidence that is relevant to establishing a common plan, scheme and design of sexual abuse,” he said.
Cosby is charged with three counts of aggravated indecent sexual assault stemming from a 2004 encounter at his nearby home with Andrea Constand, a former Temple University employee whom he had mentored. She said he drugged and molested her; he said the encounter was consensual.
But Steele did not bring the charges until December 2015, and ever since the teams of defense lawyers and prosecutors have been arguing in multiple pretrial hearings over various issues, including whether Steele can call up to 13 other women who say Cosby did to them — drugged and/or raped them — what he’s accused of doing to Constand.
Now prosecutors will be able to call only one woman, known only as “Kacey” in media accounts and “Prior Alleged Victim Six” in court documents, to testify about Cosby’s alleged “prior bad acts.” She tells a similar story to Constand: In 1996, she was 29 and worked for Cosby’s agent. The two were friends and when she went to his hotel room to talk about her career, he offered her wine and a pill. She passed out but recalls being sexually assaulted on his bed.
“The prosecution wanted to parade in an army of witnesses saying that what happened to (Constand) happened to me and thereby infer that he must have committed a crime in (the Constand) case,” Slotnick says. “They want to gloss over the major deficiencies in the complainant’s story by focusing on another case…When they bring in only one person, it’s much easier for the defense to say this is a copycat allegation, he’s a celebrity target of this kind of thing.”
Cosby’s lawyers had argued that multiple accusers were being “paraded” before the media over the last two years by celebrity lawyer Gloria Allred and other lawyers before their accounts were vetted by police. Allred said in a statement Friday she represents Prior Alleged Victim 6.
“We have seen a barrage of new accusers claiming, ‘Me, too,'” Cosby defense lawyer Angela Agrusa said at a hearing last year.
On the other hand, says McAndrew, the trial will still feature more than one accuser. “If you have two credible witnesses whose veracity is not successfully challenged, it’s much easier to convict than (if there is) just one.”
Steele could appeal this ruling but it would be an uphill battle, McAndrews added, because trial judges in Pennsylvania have broad discretion in deciding such matters.
The dozen other witnesses prosecutors sought to call are only a fraction of the five dozen women who have recently accused Cosby of drugging and/or raping them in episodes dating back to the 1960s. The Constand case is the only one to result in criminal charges because the statute of limitations on rape is comparatively lengthier in Pennsylvania than in other states where women have accused Cosby.
Cosby is also fighting civil defamation lawsuits filed by some of his accusers.

Blaq Icons: Mae C. Jemison- Engineer, Physician & NASA Astronaut 

Mae Carol Jemison was born in Decatur, Alabama, on October 17, 1956, the youngest child of Charlie Jemison and Dorothy Green. Her father was a maintenance supervisor for a charity organization, and her mother worked most of her career as an elementary school teacher of English and math at the Beethoven School in Chicago.
The family moved to Chicago, Illinois, when Jemison was three years old, to take advantage of the better educational and employment opportunities there. Jemison says that as a young girl growing up in Chicago she always assumed she would get into space. “I thought, by now, we’d be going into space like you were going to work.”She said it was easier to apply to be a shuttle astronaut, “rather than waiting around in a cornfield, waiting for ET to pick me up or something.”
In her childhood, Jemison learned to make connections to science by studying nature. Once when a splinter infected her thumb as a little girl, Jemison’s mother turned it into a learning experience. She ended up doing a whole project about pus. Jemison’s parents were very supportive of her interest in science, while her teachers were not. “In kindergarten, my teacher asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up, and I told her a scientist,” Jemison says. “She said, ‘Don’t you mean a nurse?’ Now, there’s nothing wrong with being a nurse, but that’s not what I wanted to be.”In an interview with MAKERS.com, she further explains how her sheer interest in science was not accepted. “Growing up…I was just like every other kid. I loved space, stars and dinosaurs. I always knew I wanted to explore. At the time of the Apollo airing, everybody was thrilled about space, but I remember being irritated that there were no women astronauts. People tried to explain that to me, and I did not buy it.” 


Jemison says she was inspired by Martin Luther King Jr.; to her King’s dream was not an elusive fantasy but a call to action. “Too often people paint him like Santa — smiley and inoffensive,” says Jemison. “But when I think of Martin Luther King, I think of attitude, audacity, and bravery.” Jemison thinks the civil rights movement was all about breaking down the barriers to human potential. “The best way to make dreams come true is to wake up.”
Jemison began dancing at the age of 11. “I love dancing! I took all kinds of dance — African dancing, ballet, jazz, modern — even Japanese dancing. I wanted to become a professional dancer,” said Jemison. At the age of 14, she auditioned for the leading role of “Maria” in West Side Story. She did not get the part but Jemison’s dancing skills did get her into the line up as a background dancer. “I had a problem with the singing but I danced and acted pretty well enough for them to choose me. I think that people sometimes limit themselves and so rob themselves of the opportunity to realise their dreams. For me, I love the sciences and I also love the arts,” says Jemison. “I saw the theatre as an outlet for this passion and so I decided to pursue this dream.”Later during her senior year in college, she was trying to decide whether to go to New York to medical school or become a professional dancer. Her mother told her, “You can always dance if you’re a doctor, but you can’t doctor if you’re a dancer.”
Jemison graduated from Chicago’s Morgan Park High School in 1973 and entered Stanford University at the age of 16. “I was naive and stubborn enough that it didn’t faze me,” Jemison said. “It’s not until recently that I realized that 16 was particularly young or that there were even any issues associated with my parents having enough confidence in me to [allow me to] go that far away from home.” Jemison graduated from Stanford in 1977, receiving a B.S. in chemical engineering and fulfilling the requirements for a B.A. in African and Afro-American Studies. She took initiative to get even further involved in the black community by serving as head of the Black Students Union during her college years. Jemison said that majoring in engineering as a black woman was difficult because race was always an issue in the United States. “Some professors would just pretend I wasn’t there. I would ask a question and a professor would act as if it was just so dumb, the dumbest question he had ever heard. Then, when a white guy would ask the same question, the professor would say, ‘That’s a very astute observation.'”In an interview with the Des Moines Register in 2008 Jemison said that it was difficult to go to Stanford at 16, but thinks her youthful arrogance may have helped her. “I did have to say, ‘I’m going to do this and I don’t give a crap (damn).'” She points out the unfairness of the necessity for women and minorities to have that attitude in some fields.


Jemison obtained her Doctor of Medicine degree in 1981 at Cornell Medical College. She interned at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center and later worked as a general practitioner. During medical school Jemison traveled to Cuba, Kenya and Thailand, to provide primary medical care to people living there. During her years at Cornell Medical College, Jemison took lessons in modern dance at the Alvin Ailey school. Jemison later built a dance studio in her home and has choreographed and produced several shows of modern jazz and African dance.

Gerald Anderson Lawson (Engineer) “Interchangeable Video Game Cartridges” 


Lawson was born in Queens, New York City on December 1, 1940. His father Blanton was a longshoreman with an interest in science, while his mother Mannings worked for the city, and also served on the PTA for the local school and made sure that he received a good education. Both encouraged his interests in scientific hobbies, including ham radio and chemistry. Lawson said that his first-grade teacher helped him encourage his path to be someone influential similar to George Washington Carver. While in high school, he earned money by repairing television sets. He attended both Queens College and City College of New York, but did not complete a degree at either.


In 1970, he joined Fairchild Semiconductor in San Francisco as an applications engineering consultant within their sales division. While there, he created the early arcade game Demolition Derby out of his garage. In the mid-1970s, Lawson was made Chief Hardware Engineer and director of engineering and marketing for Fairchild’s video game division. There, he led the development of the Fairchild Channel F console, released in 1976 and specifically designed to use swappable game cartridges. At the time, most game systems had the game programming stored on ROM storage soldered onto the game hardware, which could not be removed. Lawson and his team figured out how to move the ROM to a cartridge that could be inserted and removed from a console unit repeatedly, and without electrically shocking the user. This would allow users to buy into a library of games, and provided a new revenue stream for the console manufacturers through sales of these games. The Channel F was not a commercially successful product, but the cartridge approach was picked up by other console manufacturers, popularized with the Atari 2600 released in 1977.
While he was with Fairchild, Lawson and Ron Jones were the sole black members of the Homebrew Computer Club, a group of early computer hobbyists which would produce a number of industry legends, including Apple founders Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak. Lawson had noted he had interviewered Wozniak for a position at Fairchild, but did not hire him.
In 1980, Lawson left Fairchild and founded Videosoft, a video game development company which made software for the Atari 2600 in the early 1980s, as the 2600 had displaced the Channel F as the top system in the market. Videosoft closed about five years later, and he started to take on consulting work. At one point, he had been working with Stevie Wonder to produce a “Wonder Clock” that would wake a child with the sound of a parent’s voice, though it never made it to production. Lawson later worked with the Stanford mentor program and was preparing to write a book on his career.


In March 2011, Lawson was honored as an industry pioneer for his work on the game cartridge concept by the International Game Developers Association (IGDA).

Drug Kingpin Pablo Escobar’s Son Reveals His Dad…. “Worked For The CIA Selling Cocaine” 

Juan Pablo Escobar Henao, son of notorious Medellín cartel drug kingpin, Pablo Escobar, now says his father “worked for the CIA.”

 

In a new book, “Pablo Escobar In Fraganti,” Escobar, who lives under the pseudonym, Juan Sebastián Marroquín, explains his “father worked for the CIA selling cocaine to finance the fight against Communism in Central America.”
“The drug business is very different than what we dreamed,” he continues. “What the CIA was doing was buying the controls to get the drug into their country and getting a wonderful deal.”
“He did not make the money alone,” Marroquín elaborated in an interview, “but with US agencies that allowed him access to this money. He had direct relations with the CIA.”
Notably, Marroquín added, “the person who sold the most drugs to the CIA was Pablo Escobar.”
Where his first book primarily covered Escobar, the man as a father, Marroquín’s second — which has just been released in Argentina — delves into the kingpin’s “international ties of corruption in which my father had an active participation, among them with the American CIA,” he said in a recent interview.
Those government associates “were practically his partners,” which allowed Escobar to defy the law, and gave him nearly the same power as a government.

 

Predictably, this information is conveniently absent from media headlines in America.
If the CIA trafficking cocaine into the United States sounds like some tin foil conspiracy theory, think again. Their alleged role in the drug trade was exposed in 1996 in an explosive investigative series “Dark Alliance” by Gary Webb for the San Jose Mercury News. The investigation, headed up by Webb revealed ties between the CIA, Nicaraguan contras and the crack cocaine trade ravaging African-American communities.
The investigation provoked massive protests and congressional hearings, as well as overt backlash from the mainstream media to discredit Webb’s reporting. However, decades later, officials would come forward to back Webb’s original investigation up.
Then-senator John Kerry even released a detailed report claiming that not only was there “considerable evidence” linking the Contra effort to trafficking of drugs and weapons — but that the U.S. government knew about it.
El Patron, as Escobar came to be known, amassed more wealth than almost any drug dealer in history — at one point raking in around $420 million a week in revenue — and reportedly supplied about 80 percent of the world’s cocaine. Escobar landed on Forbes’ list of international billionaires for seven straight years, and — though the nature of the business makes acquiring solid numbers impossible — his estimated worth was around $30 billion.
Escobar and the Medellín cartel smuggled 15 tons of cocaine into the U.S. — every day — and left a trail of thousands of dead bodies to do so.
“It was a nine-hundred-mile run from the north coast of Colombia and was simply wide-open,” journalist Ioan Grillo wrote in the book, “El Narco: Inside Mexico’s Criminal Insurgency.” “The Colombians and their American counterparts would airdrop loads of blow out to sea, from where it would be rushed ashore in speedboats, or even fly it right onto the Florida mainland and let it crash down in the countryside.”
If what Marroquín reveals in the new book is, indeed, true, it would mean the CIA played a major role in ensuring Americans had access to boundless quantities of cocaine — while the U.S. government sanctimoniously railed against drugs to promote the drug war.


In fact, as Marroquín keenly observes, drug prohibition makes for the best pro-drug propaganda — the nature of something being illegal naturally gives it greater appeal.
That prohibition guaranteed Escobar’s bloody reign would be all the more violent. Marroquín now believes “his path of healing is reconciliation with the relatives of those whom his father ordered to kill.”
While Escobar certainly used violence, or ordered others to use violence, to effectively foment and maintain power, he wasn’t without a charitable bone in his body. As Business Insider notes, “He was nicknamed ‘Robin Hood’ after handing out cash to the poor, building housing for the homeless, constructing 70 community soccer fields, and building a zoo.”
El Patron met his fate in 1993 — by gunshot as he attempted to flee after his house was surrounded. However, the circumstances surrounding his death are still being debated today. Marroquín insists his father committed suicide rather than be shot or captured by police forces sent to hunt him down; while others believe Escobar was absolutely slain by police.
Either way, Escobar’s accumulation of wealth could be viewed as incidental to the role he played for the CIA and the war on drugs — a massive hypocrisy serving to keep people hooked on a substance deemed illegal by the State, so the State can then reap the profits generated by courts, prisons, and police work ‘necessary’ to ‘fight’ the ‘war on drugs.’
“My father was a cog in a big business of universal drug trafficking,” Marroquín explains, and when he no longer served a purpose for those using him that way, killers were sent to do away with the problem — the problem so many had a hand in creating.
Marroquín, who only revealed himself as Escobar’s son in 2009, says he’s had to forgive members of his family for their involvement in the drug business and betrayal of his father — but notes that forgiveness doesn’t mean forgetting what happened.
But he has measured perspective about the man who brutally ruled the cocaine industry.
“Pablo Escobar is by no means a role model,” he asserts.
“I admire Pablo, my father, who educated me. Not Escobar, the mafioso.”
Marroquín noted drug lords like his father might appear to have everything as their status and name garner attention, but these material gains, in actuality, take control in the end.
“The more power my father had, the poorer he lived.”

15 Year Old Girl Charged As A Juvenile In The Killing Of Her Mother. 

 A 15-year-old girl who was the subject of an Amber Alert on Monday is now in custody and charged as a juvenile in the killing of her mother.


Chastinea Reeves was the subject of that Amber Alert on Monday when police found her mother dead in their Gary home. They feared that Reeves may have been in grave danger.

Reeves had shown up at a neighbor’s house with her 4-year-old sister. She was hysterical and saying that something bad had happened to their mother. But when the neighbor went to call police, Reeves took off out the back door and disappeared.

A source says the Amber Alert was not a ruse to catch Reeves.

On Thursday, the Lake County prosecutor said he wants to try Reeves as an adult for the murder of her mother, 34-year-old Jamie Garnett, but that there is a process to that.
The Lake Country prosecutor said he is not permitted to talk about the details of the murder case because juvenile cases are secret, so he could not say how Jaimie Garnett was killed. But he said the information will come out at a hearing on April 12th when they will formally ask a judge to try Reeves as an adult.
Reeves remains in custody at the Lake County Juvenile Detention Center in Crown Point.